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[ICTs in English] Last week on ICTs in English


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  • From: Amos Claire <c.amos AT auckland.ac.nz>
  • To: "ictenglish AT mailinglist.tki.org.nz" <ictenglish AT mailinglist.tki.org.nz>
  • Subject: [ICTs in English] Last week on ICTs in English
  • Date: Mon, 31 May 2010 14:16:42 +1200
  • Accept-language: en-US
  • Acceptlanguage: en-US

Last week could be easily summed up by that saying "it never rains but it
pours"!

Great to see such enthusiastic debate, particularly when it is to do with
teaching and learning.

Last week's discussion focused primarily on writing. Initiated by a request
related to resources around 'Types of Writing and Writing Checklists'.

This week it would be great to hear how ICTs are being used to support close
or wide reading. This may include reading of written, visual or oral language.
--
Claire Amos
Facilitator: ICTs in English community
www.englishonline.tki.org.nz


Here are a few responses from last week (I won't even attempt to summarise
it).

Craig Martin shared this from Donald Murray.

The qualities of good writing

1 Meaning: There must be content in an effective piece of writing. It must
all add up to something. This is the most important element in good writing,
but although it must be listed first it is often discovered last through the
process of writing.

2 Authority: Good writing is filled with specific, accurate, honest
information. The reader is persuaded through authoritative information that
the writer knows the subject.

3 Voice: Good writing is marked by an individual voice. The writer's voice
may be the most significant element in distinguishing memorable writing from
good writing.

4 Development: The writer satisfies the reader's hunger for information. The
beginning writer almost always overestimates the reader's hunger for language
and underestimates the readers hunger for information.

5 Design: A good piece of writing is elegant in the mathematical sense. It
has form, structure, order, focus, coherence. It gives the reader a sense of
completeness.

6 Clarity: Good writing is marked by a simplicity which is appropriate to the
subject. The writer has searched for and found the right word, the effective
verb, the clarifying phrase. The writer has removed the writer so that the
reader sees through the writers style to the subject, which is clarified and
simplified.

It is my belief that these qualities are the same for poetry and fiction as
well as non-fiction.

I'd suggest this applies to film, and web content also.

I attempted to redirect discussion to ICTs place in the teaching of writing:

One of the great things about English is the fact that we can be creative, we
can each deliver different approaches, messages, ideas and activities and
still be safely in the realm of the English Curriculum and we can be
improving our students writing even if our attitudes and ideas differ...

As this is the 'ICTs in English' forum, I would like to now redirect this
discussion. How are we using ICTs to encourage our students writing? Does the
use of ICTs in the writing improve student outcomes, or does it hinder them??

Your thoughts on ICTs and their role in the teaching and learning of writing
is invited!

And Karen Meluish offered this response:

...

I wonder, though, if the question is more about how technology can improve
upon/extend best practice in writing (rather than how ICTs encourage them to
write). My feeling is that the technology, in and of itself, is not what
makes children write. It is a powerful combination of the the teacher's
understanding of content, of the pedagogy and the opportunities offered by
the technology therein.

So, for example, the starting points for planning would be a key learning
concept(s), combined with what the students were needing and interested in.
There may be opportunities at that point to explore the ideas using
particular tools/sites. The way writing is fostered is underpinned by best
practice in literacy and pedagogies associated specifically with teaching
literacy...and the technology is woven into this, chosen by the
teacher/student based on the best practices for learning.

To what extent do we know why we have chosen a tool or a website in terms of
what we hope it will help the students learn?


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  • [ICTs in English] Last week on ICTs in English, Amos Claire, 05/31/2010

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